In Episode 1 of the Hiring to Firing Podcast, Troutman Pepper Partners Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs sit down with European Metal Recycling VP of People and Deputy General Counsel Kate Puccio to discuss the hit show Emily in Paris and the lessons learned about national origin based on events from the show. This episode blends pop culture and fashion into a discussion about important and contemporary legal issues in the workplace.

Continue Reading Lessons Learned on National Origin Discrimination from Emily in Paris

What do Emily in ParisSquid GameSeveranceTed Lasso, and Moneyball have in common? Find out by listening and subscribing to our Hiring to Firing Podcast hosted by Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs. The pair delve into hot-button labor and employment law issues with unique perspectives drawing on pop culture and hit shows and movies. Stay informed and entertained!
Continue Reading Introduction to Hiring to Firing Podcast

Q: Do work-from-home arrangements create a heightened risk that company trade secrets may be exposed?

A: Without proper precautions, in many ways, “yes.”

Since the onset of the pandemic, we have observed an increased use of external storage devices by employees to save and access work-related documents. We have heard several reasons for this, but the primary one is that employees often complain that accessing large data files remotely takes considerably more time than when they access files via the network in the company’s physical offices. Thus, employees have resorted more often to using personally owned external storage devices, such as external hard drives and thumb drives to download and access company materials.

Continue Reading Protecting Trade Secrets in a Work-From-Home World

Last week, the United States Department of Labor (DOL) issued its long-awaited proposed change to the minimum salary threshold for the white-collar exemptions under the Fair Labor Standards Act. The new minimum salary threshold is $35,308/year (or $679/week).

This new rule is not finalized nor in effect now. Rather, the new rule is open for

The Bloomberg Editorial Board recently published an article entitled “Too Many Workers Are Trapped By Non-Competes” arguing that the practice of requiring relatively low-wage and/or unskilled workers to sign non-compete agreements is a drag on the economy and is contributing to wage stagnation. The article contends that restricting unspecialized workers’ ability to freely change jobs

The National Labor Relations Board is signaling yet another change to the joint employer test in its recent issuance of a new proposed rule.  The Board has waffled back and forth on this important issue recently, creating a lot of uncertainty for employers.  Here’s an explanation of what has been going on and what is

For the past several years, folks in the HR space have had to pay special attention to the language in their handbooks and employment policies out of fear of violating rules established by a series of decisions from the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). Those decisions established a tough standard for evaluating facially neutral employment

Reversing itself, the Second Circuit held on Monday, February 26, that sexual orientation discrimination is discrimination “because of . . . sex” under Title VII in Zarda v. Altitude Express. The Second Circuit’s decision aligns it with the Seventh Circuit and places it squarely at odds with the Eleventh Circuit.

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