Q: A former employee has invited some of her former co-workers and clients to connect on LinkedIn. Is this a violation of her non-solicitation agreement with our company?

A: It depends. In general, a generic invitation to connect will not be viewed as a violation of a non-solicitation agreement.  However, if an invitation is accompanied by a personalized message or other targeted communication, it likely will be viewed as a violation.
Continue Reading LinkedIn Activity May Violate Non-Solicitation Agreements

Q.  Can I fire an employee for making disparaging comments about the company and its supervisors on social media?

A.  According to a recent Second Circuit opinion, if the social media post was made in the context of union organizing activity, then the answer likely is no. The National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) prohibits employers from terminating an employee based on that employee’s union-related activity. If the employee’s protected activity rises to the level of “opprobrious” or abusive conduct, however, it could lose the protection of the NLRA.   Nonetheless, the standard for a finding that the employee engaged in “opprobrious” or abusive conduct is quite high.
Continue Reading Profanity-Laced Social Media Posts May Be Permissible in the Context of a Union Organizing Campaign