Q: I heard that New York City recently amended the salary transparency law. What are the key aspects of the amendment and when does it go into effect?

A: As discussed in our previous post, an upcoming law requires New York City employers to include salary bands in job advertisements or postings. Employers must include the minimum and maximum salary or hourly rate for the position, and the requirement applies to both internal and external postings.

Continue Reading NYC Amends Upcoming Salary Transparency Law and Releases Key Guidance

Q: What do employers need to know about state and local pay transparency and salary equity laws?

A: Pay equity has been a hot topic for employers over the last few years and it continues to make headlines. Today, March 8, is International Women’s Day and March 15 marks this year’s “Equal Pay Day” – a date meant to symbolize how far into the year women must work to earn what men earned in the previous year.

Continue Reading Pay Transparency and Salary Equity Laws: Coming to a State Near You?

Q: Can you provide an overview of Election Day 2020 ballot measures approved by voters that may impact the workplace?

A: While President-elect Joe Biden’s victory over incumbent President Donald Trump dominated Election Day 2020, voters also approved various ballot measures that will have repercussions for workplaces throughout the nation. Below find a summary of some of the biggest employment-related ballot measures approved by voters.

Continue Reading Voters Nationwide Approve Ballot Measures Impacting the Workplace

Q: I heard New York is changing its rules around tip credits for some types of employees. What do I need to know?

A:  A tip credit is a concept permitted under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and many state laws.  A tip credit allows employers to pay employees a cash wage of less than the minimum wage and take a tip credit up to a set amount.  For example, under the FLSA, employers can pay tipped employees a minimum cash wage of $2.13 per hour, and take a tip credit of $5.12 per hour.  If employees receive less than $5.12 an hour in tips, the employer must pay the employee the difference so that an employee always earns at least $7.25 (the minimum wage) per hour.  Regardless of whether an employer takes a tip credit, all tips are the property of the employee.  So, if an employer takes a tip credit and the employee makes more than $5.12 per hour in tips, the additional amount belongs to the tipped employee.
Continue Reading New York State To Eliminate Tip Credit For Many Employees Beginning June 2020

Q: I heard that the Pennsylvania Supreme Court recently issued a major ruling regarding overtime pay. What do I need to know?

A: On November 20, 2019, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court rejected the application of the fluctuating workweek method (“FWW Method”) of calculating overtime under the Pennsylvania Minimum Wage Act (PMWA) and its corresponding regulations.

Q. A client of my company asked whether it could offer production bonuses to our employees who deliver their work product prior to the deadline. Does the FLSA require my company to account for these third-party bonuses when calculating the regular rate of pay for overtime purposes?

A.  The answer to your question depends on

Q. Has the salary threshold increased for exempt status under the Fair Labor Standards Act?

A. On September 24 — more than five years after the Obama administration first proposed updating the overtime regulations of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) — the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) released the final version of its long-anticipated

Q: I have employees who work in New Jersey.  What do I need to know about the minimum wage increase?

A: New Jersey recently passed a law that will raise the minimum wage by increments over the next five years.  The minimum wage, which currently is $8.85 per hour, will increase to $10.00 per hour on July 1, 2019.  It will rise to $11.00 per hour on January 1, 2020, and will increase by one dollar each subsequent year until January 1, 2024, when it will land at $15.00.  Future minimum wage increases after 2024 will be tied to inflation.
Continue Reading New Jersey Minimum Wage to Increase to $15.00 by 2024

Q: I have employees in Connecticut.  What do I need to know about the new pay equity law?

A:  Effective January 1, 2019, employers are not allowed to: (1) inquire (whether directly or through a third party) about a prospective employee’s wage history; or (2) prohibit employees from disclosing or discussing the amount of their wages or the wages of another employee that has been voluntarily disclosed by the other employee.
Continue Reading Connecticut Law Prohibiting Wage History Inquiries and Restrictions on Employee Wage Discussions Now in Effect

Q.  I suspect that our company may have inadvertently committed overtime and minimum wage violations. Is there a way I can make this right without incurring substantial legal liability?

A.  Possibly. Earlier this year, the United States Department of Labor (DOL) Wage and Hour Division announced the creation of a new nationwide pilot program called the Payroll Audit Independent Determination (PAID) program. In short, the PAID program encourages employers to conduct payroll self-audits and, if they discover overtime or minimum wage violations, self-report those violations to the DOL and work with the DOL to rectify the problem and ensure employees are paid any wages owed.
Continue Reading PAID Program Provides a Way to Resolve Overtime and Minimum Wage Violations