Q:  Does my company have an affirmative defense to a sexual harassment claim if the company has a policy for reporting sexual harassment and an employee never makes a report of sexual harassment under that policy?

A:  Earlier this summer, in a case called Minarsky v. Susquehanna County, the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit (governing employers in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, and the Virgin Islands) ruled that “a mere failure to report one’s harassment is not per se unreasonable,” even though the Third Circuit had previously “often found that a plaintiff’s outright failure to report persistent sexual harassment is unreasonable as a matter of law.”
Continue Reading Employer May Not Have Affirmative Defense to Harassment Claim even if Employee Fails to Report Harassment

Q.  Are there any laws related to settlement of sex harassment claims in Maryland that I should be aware of?

A.  In response to the many high-profile scandals in the news, several jurisdictions have enacted anti-sexual harassment legislation. To date, Vermont, New York, and Washington passed anti-sexual harassment laws. Maine, North Carolina, Ohio, and New Jersey introduced similar statutes in state legislatures. The new legislation aims to reduce sexual harassment in the workplace by prohibiting waiver provisions in employment contracts, preventing non-disclosure and other provisions in sexual harassment settlement agreements, and providing new avenues for employee reporting and disclosure. Maryland is the latest state to say “#MeToo.”
Continue Reading New Maryland Law Requires Employers to Gather Information on Settlement of Sex Harassment Claims

Q.  Can my company require its employees to sign an arbitration agreement mandating that they arbitrate all employment disputes, and limiting their ability to participate in a class action against the company?

A.  On May 21, in a 5-4 opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that arbitration agreements in which an employee waives the right

Q.  If a supervisor makes a comment about an employee’s age, will the company be liable for age discrimination?

A.  While ageist comments are never appropriate in the workplace, an Illinois federal court recently ruled that a single age-related comment was insufficient for an employee to prevail on an age discrimination claim.
Continue Reading Single Ageist Comment May Be Insufficient to Sustain Age Discrimination Claim

Q.  Has the #MeToo Movement led to any changes on how companies settle harassment complaints?

A.  While there are numerous legislative initiatives on the horizon intended to change how employers handle harassment complaints in light of the #MeToo Movement, the most significant federal change is a little known revision to the Tax Code recently enacted.
Continue Reading Confidential Harassment Settlements No Longer Subject to Tax Deduction

Q.  Do you have any tips on how to ensure that our company holiday party does not lead to a new year liability?

A.  As the year comes to a close, many employers often celebrate with a holiday party as a way to thank employees for their contributions. The holiday party is meant to build comradery with co-workers, and provides an opportunity for all employees, management and non-management, to “let their hair down”.  A festive occasion however, can turn into a legal nightmare if employers fail to set expectations.  Everyone has heard stories of an employee (or two) having too much to drink at the holiday party and making an inappropriate joke, getting “touchy” with a co-worker, or getting into a car accident.  By following a few simple rules, employers can attempt to prevent such legal disasters.  Below are some suggestions to help ensure that your holiday party does not end up as the focus of a lawsuit.
Continue Reading How to Celebrate the Holidays Without Ending Up in Court: Tips for Hosting a Corporate Holiday Party

Q.  There is a lot of conversation in the national media about the #MeToo movement. How do I ensure that my employees are treating each other properly?

A.  In October of 2017, the two-word hashtag,“#MeToo,” created a social media movement amongst women and men who have experienced sexual harassment. The hashtag was an attempt to educate society about the prevalence of sexual harassment. As a result of the movement, men and women all over the world have been reporting inappropriate behavior in the workplace.  Thus, employers need to be ready for the impact of the MeToo movement and make sure that they have the appropriate policies and procedures in place to effectively address harassment complaints.
Continue Reading Tips for Addressing and Investigating Sexual Harassment Allegations in the Workplace in Light of the #MeToo Movement

Uber made headlines last week when Susan Fowler, a former engineer, claimed that she was harassed by her direct supervisor and her complaints were ignored by the human resources department. Uber took another hit a few days later when a recently-hired executive resigned amidst allegations that he had harassed employees at his former company.

How can you prevent your company from becoming the next media story?
Continue Reading Uber Sex Harassment Scandal Is Sobering Reminder of the Costs of Ignoring Complaints

Q:  What does it mean to discriminate against someone based on their national origin?

A:  Title VII prohibits employers from acting in a way that would have the purpose or effect or discriminating against an employee because of his or her national origin.

But what does the term “discrimination based on national origin” really mean?
Continue Reading EEOC Issues Guidance Interpreting National Origin Discrimination